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Do n't think I am completely biased. How UGLY remote controller Just amazing how they really think UI So do these sam adams. I like the pbr better. I really should get a Hawaiian friend. Seems like just yesterday we were reading Madeline. Is she ready? She sobbed over Kung Fu Panda.

It makes me think twice. She thinks Bruce is her dad because she does n't look like the other two. Blinking because my contact was dry and this chick thought I was winking at her O. O '' Nice braids cutie. Oct 5 , Harry Truman made the 1st ever Presidential address aired on television. I 've made it! See , the Racist is. Will perform new song with The Roots band. Mentioned James Franco. This is memorable! Link Time!

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Watching UFC now. I do n't know what part of that makes me want to kill someone the most. Such an inspiration!

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Stuff like this is why I do n't pray. Unfortunately , they were created for the citizens of Brazil. It is not that he loves the Constitution less , but that he adores Totally impressed , not scary or weird like I thought it 'd be. Midday News Video. She looked like a bad drag queen! So yeah , pretty majorly stoked. Then followed 4 Selena hate pages. Loll wow. Cody why do n't you like her I ca n't trust you anymore. We are having an awesome Day!!!

Gorbachev 's 80th birthday was a huge success! I do , too! LOVE it. I gave up partying , dear Zysha! My Idol is Michelle Obama ahahaha. Try it :. Because she 's not stupid. Ca n't say same for the Donald. I need to get out to LA!!! All these Prince shows at the Forum are sounding amazing!!

I really ca n't stop laughing right now. They better say that. Friend : And? Get there early The infamous pop star and fa Now Playing! I won the nobel peace prize and all I have done up this point is be really good at running fpr President. If you 're walking down the right path and you 're willing to keep walking , eventually you 'll make progress.

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President Obama has communicated with other countries to establish peace. I hate Microsoft for that! Ever notice how much better looking women are after a divorce? Why is that? I love how Miley 's interviews always beam with warmth , connection , confidence and humility. Like try mcdonald , its fucking delicious. Oh and of course George Lopez. Miley Cyrus , I want your eyes. Demi Lovato , I want your smile. Selena Gomez , I want your boyfriend. What the hell is a disco stick? Biggie smalls the millionaire , the mansion the yacht.

The 2 weed spots , the two hot glocks. Am not sure if it is because of d south American tour! I doubt it! The pressure of being president! He has aged. DD9 is rocking! I 've heard tons of great feedback from dealers! WIunion p2. Her new song Celebration is amazing. It all starts once we hit followers! I love that the television knows what I want. Girls wet like they living in a fish tank? I have heard he got one , I just do n't know what for. I found out some time ago , I hated that shit! Her face. Where did that come from? Roll In Libya. Potentially less good news : Sonia Rao 2.

Good news : She 's okay! Wow , I 'm freeeeeaaaking tired. Rugby and Golf added to Olympics. Send US the Gold Medal already! My loves a revolver my sex is killer do you want to die happy do you want to die happy. SmashFit even us coaches need to be coached!!!! The top athletes have coaches. The book was written in bad English, and full of plumping long stories from beginning to end. Samuel Goodrich, who, as we have seen, felt that children should be presented with rational ideas rather than nonsensical verse, spoke with grief about English efforts to revive the rhymes: 'A quaint, quiet, scholarly gentleman, called Mr Felix Summerly 4 —a dear lover of children—was invented to preside over the enterprise, to rap the knuckles of Peter Parley, and woo back the erring generation of children to the good old orthodox rhymes and jingles of England.

She recommends her son to learn 'good, sensible things' instead. But these turn out to be Watts' hymns—"'I hate 'em,'" says Timothy tersely, and goes on shouting the jingle he has composed:.

Mother Goose

And should anyone think that composing nonsensical jingles is easy, they have only to consider the many people who have tried and failed. The New Englander Eliza Follen compiled Little Songs for Little Boys and Girls in , hoping to 'catch that good-humored pleasantry, that musical nonsense which makes Mother Goose so attractive to children', while excluding its 'vulgarisms and other defects'. But the result was banal. Sara Josepha Hale — was another American who unwittingly contributed to the Mother Goose corpus.

She had included 'Mary had a little lamb' 7 in Poems for Children in The preface to this expressed her disapproval of the traditional rhymes: 'I know little children love to read rhymes and sing little verses, and such manner of spending their time is not good. She was an earnest lady whose verses in The Wise Boys told of oppressively sensible children such as Fred, who always thinks before he acts and reasons 'there's caution needed here'—with the result that he meets with great success in trade and 'grows richer every year':.

In an abridged chapbook version, printed in Windsor, Vermont, in , a verse of 'Yankee Doodle' has been added—a rare topical touch:. Then, about Edmund Munroe and David Francis, Boston booksellers and publishers, put out Mother Goose's Quarto, or Melodies Complete , and though it was only a small book about pages it was the largest collection of rhymes that had yet appeared.

It included a pedlar's song which gives a glimpse of children's toys of the time—'babies', pipes, 'trunks to fill with weekly pence', plumed horses, windmills, toy soldiers, guns and horses. The Quarto was not an influential book in itself, but its successor was. Munroe and Francis published Mother Goose's Melodies in , basing it largely on the Quarto , which it condensed into ninety-six pages. It was highly popular and there were many subsequent editions. The cover engraving shows a goose dressed like a nurse, with attentive goslings all around her, and the preamble, 'Hear what Ma'am Goose says', tells readers to pay no heed to the old women who say that 'my enchanting, quieting, soothing volume' ought to be laid aside for more learned books.

The adult flavour so evident in Mary Cooper's Tommy Thumb's Song Book of some ninety years before has disappeared; some of the rhymes have been unobtrusively reworded and others omitted. The attractive wood engravings some of them in the first edition by Dr Alexander Anderson 9 have also done much to make the rhymes childlike.

We also find an example of the arbitrary way in which over the centuries verses have been wrenched out of context and declared to be 'nursery rhymes'. On page 71 there are three, of which one begins:. This is in fact taken from a ballad by Sir Walter Scott , though presented in isolation like this it is mysterious, not least because of the Scots names.

It was a curious inclusion, and one that did not survive. The Melodies bear all the marks of their English origins. There are robins and cuckoos, and kings and queens. This must surely have American origins. Santa Claus was known in New York in the early years of the nineteenth century, since children in were being warned of the foolishness of belief in 'old Santa-claw'. Dutch settlers had brought the gift-giving St Nicholas with them, but in there was obvious doubt about how his name was spelt. This little eight-page book published in New York in is the first known American Christmas book.

Issued anonymously, it was in fact written and illustrated by Arthur J. Stansbury, a former Presbyterian minister.


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The little illustrations, clearly the work of an amateur hand, include one of a sleigh drawn by a single reindeer, with a tall chimney stack in the background, accompanied by the rhyme. It is likely that Clement Moore, who was a friend of the publisher William Gilley, had this in mind when he wrote 'A Visit from St Nicholas' a year later as a gift for his own family. This poem, the first American children's classic, was to set the scene for Christmas Eve in perpetuity. The Fairy Tale. Providence, RI, William S. The character of the series, said the prospectus, 'may be briefly described as anti-Peter Parleyism'.

The earliest known printing is in a Scottish collection of verse of c. Alexander Anderson — has been called 'the father of wood-engraving in the United States '. A great admirer of Bewick, he used the same white-line technique to produce sophisticated engravings. Mother Goose is known worldwide in virtually every household in which English is spoken. Children everywhere rollick with joy and laughter at her rhymes. They sit entranced by her tales. She is quoted by heart. She is a familiar and beloved part of the family. Her titles outsell all others with the exception of the Bible.

She is manifested in the Great Mother figures of world myth. But who was she? Where did she come from? She is old. But how old? Attempting to trace Mother Goose's roots is not unlike trying to untangle the web of Miss Muffet's spider. They are embedded in many lands and in ages long past. They are found in history, literature, art, folklore, mythology, and etymology. Many and varied are those who would lay claim to Mother Goose! Most of this wizened old friend's ancestry does her proud, but—as in all family histories—there are a few who could best be forgotten. It is claimed that Mother Goose is buried in Boston.

Tourists have made the pilgrimage there to find the Old Granary Burial Ground and to pay their respects. Unfortunately, the tomb is that of Mary Balston Goose d. Although Elizabeth probably is buried in the Old Granary Burial Ground, she lies in an unmarked grave. Elizabeth was a very noble old soul, mother of six and stepmother of ten, who loved whiling away her days by entertaining her grandchildren with song and story.

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Her son-in-law, Thomas Fleet by name and an eighteenth-century publisher by trade, saw the commercial value in his in-law's stories, songs, and ditties. He is said to have collected and published them. However, no copy of any such volume is extant. This was followed in by the C. Francis collection, which bore the statement, "the whole compared, revised and sanctioned by one of the annotators of the Goose family.

Both were probably well-meaning but misguided efforts of early Boston publishers to cement Mother Goose to that area. These publishers were not the only ones hoping to swell their coffers by offering editions of Mother Goose. Sometime in the s—the exact year is unknown—London bookstalls were flooded with John Newbery's Mother Goose's Melodies. This was a collection of well-known rhymes for children that is believed to have been edited by no less than the renowned Oliver Goldsmith , 5 who is known to have authored some of Newbery's chapbooks and the nursery classic Goody-two-shoes.

Authorities see his indelible imprint on the work and suspect that he may even have composed some of the verses. John Newbery got the idea for his book from his neighbor, the Frenchman, Charles Perrault. Perrault's work cannot, however, be dispensed with quite yet, as his subtitle is of import. Oye is Old French for "goose. However, this French phrase was also a well-known figure of speech of that time 9 being roughly equivalent to "old wives' tales," "tall tales," or "tales of make believe.

Therefore, instead of being a simple statement of authorship, it may also be viewed as descriptive of the tales told. The eminent folklorist Andrew Lang discovered this term used in a work dating back to Jean Loret's La muse historique Historic muse. This leads back to the time of the goose girl—a familiar figure in medieval English communities who may have contributed to Mother Goose lore. It was the sole responsibility of the goose girl to see that nothing happened to the town's geese—an important source of protein, which was absent in the daily diet of most citizens of that time.

This was a lonely task, and to combat this loneliness, goose girls attracted attention by becoming adept at storytelling and spreading news. The tales and rhymes told by one would be passed on to others, eventually making the goose girl part storyteller. Scholars have noted that some of these stories found their way into early collections of folktales, further contributing to the teller's being associated with the goose. History adds two Berthas to Mother Goose's family tree, and both were queens. One was the wife of Robert II of France c. However pious, he was excommunicated by the Church since there was a close blood relationship between him and the wife he chose.

Rumor was that an offspring had a head resembling that of a goose. The other Bertha was also French, a patroness of children, and the wife of Pepin c. Her association with the goose was much happier; she simply had webbed toes. She was also more fortunate in her offspring. Her son was none other than Charlemagne, future ruler of the Holy Roman Empire. Images of a Bertha with her goose-foot can be seen in various old churches in France, but it is unclear which Bertha is represented.

Because of their common name, these two historical Berthas have become inextricably entwined with the mythological earth-mother Bertha or Berchta —a spinner from Germany, who, like the mother of Charlemagne, was goosefooted. This German Bertha was borrowed by the French, 15 who then depicted her as spinning her yarn and her stories with an audience of attentive children clustered around. Northern Germany also had Holde , whose similarity to Bertha Berchta did not stop with her goose-foot. Both ruled in limbo, where the souls of unbaptised children have been reputed tor go.

Both watched over the very young, oversaw spinning, and were patrons of the hearth. It should be noted that the hearth is symbolized by the goose, for the goose is associated with nurturing, and she mates for life. The goose is a common motif popular even today, especially in kitchens. Spinning, or being a spinner, is mentioned in connection with several branches of Mother Goose's tree. Exactly what does spinning signify? Of course, the obvious is spinning yarns and tales—especially fairy tales—for the amusement of others.

It is interesting to note that fairy originally meant fate. Spinning was also symbolic of fertility, death, and the underworld limbo. Geese were believed to hold the souls of the unbaptized. Therefore, a goose spinning conjured up the fate of unbaptized souls. However, except for her goose-foot 18 and the fact that she, too, was a patroness of children, nothing more is found in support of her claim.

There is one other person to be added to our record of Mother Goose. Strangely enough, she is not motherly, grandmotherly, or even a teller of tales. However, she was intelligent and wise enough to match wits with King Solomon: the Queen of Sheba. Did she not visit Solomon to test his wisdom with her riddles? And she may even have been goose-footed! Her left foot is described in Western European lore as being webbed, and she has thus been depicted in Western art and literature.

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However, early Jewish and Muslim lore have her as ass-footed, her legs being extremely hairy. An explanation for this discrepancy may lie in an early scribe having written pes anserinus Latin for "goose-footed" instead of pes asininus Latin for "ass-footed". What is the special significance of the goosefoot? This is explained in the lore of numbers. The number five is associated with the holy cross. It has four outer points with the fifth being the inner point where connecting lines from the four outer points converge.

The bird, as well as the goose's webbed foot, has three toes pointing forward and one backward. Therefore, a bird's footprint has the same five points as the cross. Thus Mother Goose has manifested herself throughout the ages. However, her family chart does not go from one generation to the next. Is it, therefore, safe to conclude that she is like the Scandinavian goddess Freia? Freia was originally a swan, 22 but the nature myth was humanized with only a foot retaining the swan form. This later degenerated into a goose-foot. Freia is the goddess of love and housewifely accom-plishments, especially spinning.

She also has the ability to divide herself into parts with each part having its own life and personality. Thus, Mother Goose could have actually been each of those we have traced back through the ages and still be herself. What did she look like? Her portraits are as varied as her family tree.

The old woman as narrator is traditional in ancient lore, and Mother Goose is no exception. She is always, and always has been, shown as being old. After all, being old is symbolic of being wise. Long ago, she was almost witchlike with her dark flowing cloak, pointed hat and chin, and long nose. Occasionally, she even had a wart. Even so, there was a kindness about her that distinguished her from her witch counterpart even as she rode a broom. Her nose was beaklike and, with her narrow face, she actually resembled the goose with which she was often pictured.

Sometimes she carried a wand or even an egg, the symbol of fertility. At other times, she was empty-handed. Her spinning wheel may or may not have been in evidence. Gradually, her witchlike mien became more grandmotherly. Glasses were added; features were softened. Always she is at the center of adoring children—unless the artist depicts her soaring through the heavens on the back of a very large goose. Sometimes she is the goose itself, dressed in human clothes and wearing a bonnet. But no matter what the depiction, there remains no doubt in the viewer's mind concerning who is represented.

She always inspires a warm glow in the heart. The need of the divine feminine is fulfilled in her archetypical character. Why did she choose the goose? Why did she not take some other form? Among primitive Eastern Peoples the goose figured largely in their story of creation. The symbol is a common one … to signify creative force or spirit. The carriage and gait of the goose were the symbol of majesty; the eye, of wisdom and omniscience; the hiss, of vengeance and destructive force; the egg, of creative power. The goose was said to have laid the golden egg, that is the sun, giver of all light and life … The goose is the surest-winged and most unwearying bird in flight, soaring to the very peak of heaven and to the remotest regions with ease and certainty.

Its winging power was symbolic of the flight of thought and imagination. Is it not unreasonable to think that the fertile mind of Perrault would seize upon this symbol to represent the vague authorship of a body of imaginative literature that has never been excelled, and whose roots struck deep down into the soil of antiquity? Moreover, the words "goose" and "ghost," that is "spirit," are said to have a common root. Thus Mother Goose becomes the great Mother Spirit whose domain is the boundless kingdom of childhood, and who is pictured in her own lore as mounting the wings of the wind to carry her to every part of the world … She is the timeless one.

She belongs to no age, clime, or people. But she lived then, she lives now, she ever will live …. Yes, Mother Goose is alive. She is with us still. She is a part of the world's collective unconscious. As such, she is truly a common relative of all humanity. Western culture is alive with her imprint, and her influence continues to spread. The folklore, lullabies, and ballads that gave rise to her rhymes have parallels the world over. After all, children are children everywhere. They are all comforted by, amused by, and laugh at many of the same things.

Outside the West, more attention is being given to the collection of folktales and lore that have been handed down by word of mouth from generation to generation just as Mother Goose's were. Their publication helps fill the gap for children in those countries with limited indigenous literature. Their translation and dissemination make this literature available to all. The traditions and culture revealed cannot but help illustrate the oneness of humanity and enrich us all. Both refer to a goose under the age of four months—thus a "green" goose, or a gosling.

II, Canadian Bookman 21 Oct. It is interesting to note that Menelik, the son of Solomon and Sheba, established the Ethiopian dynasty of which Haile Selassie was a direct descendent. New York, N. Mother Goose to Homer! How far apart they seem! Yet someone has truly said, "If you want your child to love Homer, give him Mother Goose. This flawless literature delights the child, awakens in him a responsiveness to rhyme and rhythm, develops his sense of humor through the nonsense surprise jingles, pleases his dramatic sense with verses about Miss Muffet and Little Boy Blue, and gives him a feeling of relationship with these old-fashioned children.

At his mother's knee, he is simply charmed with the irresistible appeal of this age-old, worldwide literature which cultivates ear and taste with rhythmic measure, beautiful sound, and quaint imagery. This pleasure has its roots in some power so deep and fundamental that it defies explanation or imitation.

But when the drama of English history brings these famous personages to the stage, and the college student comes to take a lively interest in the human side of the English monarchs and their courts, he is intrigued to see the annals of their times reveal with caustic wit the comedies, tragedies, and romances of high and low.

For the working people, too, used these rhymes as the only means of voicing their complaints, e. This recounts the spirit of discontent and revolt in the reign of Edward VI , when the king and wealthy nobles demanded so much wool that vast tracts of arable land were turned into sheep folds, resulting in an economic crisis, lack of foodstuffs, and field labor, low wages, and high costs. Katherine Elwes Thomas, after much scholarly research, also offers, in The Real Personages in Mother Goose , interpretations of many other nursery rhymes, some of them attributed to Shakespeare and other literary wits, some even to Queen Elizabeth.

As in the case of "Little Jack Horner," the monks, to satisfy the avaricious Henry, sent him twenty-four title deeds to monastic property. According to the prevailing custom, these were arranged in the form of a pie. Catherine of Aragon eating English bread with Spanish assurance that the divorce from Henry could not take place. Elizabeth was often dubbed "the Cat. Her father had been called "the Dunne Cowe" because of heraldic bearings. Elizabeth, herself, playfully spoke of the staid Walsingham as "the moon" when she sent him on a trip to the imprisoned Mary of Scotland, apparently to investigate an alleged plot of Mary against Elizabeth.

When Elizabeth tired of her sometime favorite, the Earl of Leicester, she playfully jeered at him by calling him her "lap dog. She refused on the ground that when people saw him they would know she was near, and vice versa. The "dish" was the formal title of the courtier who brought the royal dishes to the queen's dining room. The "spoon" was a beautiful lady-in-waiting who tasted the royal meals as a precaution against poisoning Elizabeth. The "dish" in this case was Edward of Hertford who secretly married the "spoon," Lady Katherine Grey. When the vain and jealous Elizabeth heard of this, she threw them both into prison for the remaining seven years of their life.

They had two children in prison. Since none of all this underlying meaning has come to the child, he simply revels in the happy, jingling rhymes that add sunshine to his joyous hours. It is only a step from Mother Goose to simple poetry. By careful guidance, the child can be led to love the best. He already responds to rhyme and rhythm, alliteration and imagery, and through poems about things that fall within his observation, or that appeal to his inherent ideals, mother, teacher, or librarian may lay the foundation of literary appreciation that will normally develop through his school and college years.

He may even, in these early years, be introduced to poets who will be his lifelong companions, whom he will not only meet in his college course but cherish long years after. Stevenson was endeared to the child's heart because he saw through the child's mind and with photographic precision presented what he saw. The very qualities of sincerity, simplicity, understanding, clearness, strength, and musical cadence which occurred in his children's poetry will recur in the books assigned for college reading.

Because he early came in contact with poems by a host of authors, including Riley, A. If Wordsworth and Bryant drew him to the woods and fields and made him love nature and nature's God, he may find rare enjoyment in the mature essays of Burroughs or Dallas Lore Sharp. Possibly, he may follow the trail to nature fiction or travel and in worthwhile literature relish a wholesome fare which will make less worthy books pallid and tasteless. Lessons of courage, heroism, unselfishness, truth, faith, love, and sacrifice abound in beautiful poetry quite within the range of eight to eighty.

Some current poems by a little-known author appealed to my class this year. The following is an excerpt:. No doubt, the imagination cultivated in poetry is further exercised through beautiful folk or fairy tales, beautifully told. Not all folk tales are suitable for children.

In fact, we know that folk tales were not originally written for children but were told by simple people around the evening fire to wile away the long hours. Some tales are gory, cruel, immoral, and unfit. But there is such a wealth of lovely lore from which to draw that no child's store should be impoverished. Andersen, Hawthorne, and Padraic Colum with individual and inimitable style have presented a host of deathless favorites to people the child's world. Who better than Colum can throw open the gates of Troy and over land and sea follow Odysseus, making the Greek hero come alive for the boy or girl breathlessly traveling in his wake?

The folk tale does far more than develop the imagination or furnish a means of escape from the commonplace into the magical. In their inherent desire for wish fulfillment, the boy or girl read themselves into the story. With the right book, they broaden and deepen, mentally, emotionally, spiritually. Seeing virtue rewarded and vice punished with poetic justice, they learn valuable lessons of virtue and courtesy. Isn't one secret of the tremendous success of Walt Disney 's Snow White the artist's remarkable understanding and portrayal of human nature?

Isn't this quality of the very essence of the folk or fairy tales? Isn't the sense of humor a delicious quality common to the primitive droll or noodle tale, to Uncle Remus, Alice in Wonderland , Kipling's Just So Stories and Stockton's charmingly absurd fiction? What a delight for the college student who renews acquaintance with Stockton when he picks up a copy of The Casting Away of Mrs. Lecks and Mrs.

What more effective counter-irritant to modern sophistication, what better introduction to poetry or mythology or romance? Because, as a child, he loved the stories of Grimm, the college student with scientific archeological bent may care to delve into the past as did those scholarly brothers Grimm, who recorded by folk tale the religious and social ideals of primitive peoples.

Simultaneously or successively, the child may call for fairy tale or myth, for they have elements in common. Tokyo [], Sanseido. Brown raw silk, very good, p. This book was used as a woodblock printing manual for many years, and has always been RARE. Original grey cloth, red pictorial onlay to front board with titles in black, entirely unopened. Spine lightly darkened, extremities faintly rubbed. A near-fine copy. Title vignette and 30 woodcut illustrations in black and red including two full-page and ornamental bordures by Martin Levitt. First edition, number 52 of copies on folded hemp paper, signed by Levitt.

This is the first Mandrill Press publication, which appears to have published only one other book : Flower-gazer: Japanese poems, printed in This publication, in the Japanese woodblock printing style, brings together Haiku poems of various eras which "were collected casually over a period of years and in some cases we are unable to identify the poet or give a date". It also includes Japanese folk tale Oshidori, translated by Greek-Irish writer Lafcadio Hearn , known best for his books about Japan, especially his collections of Japanese legends and ghost stories. Blue cloth covers,accordion folded, title slip, all edge silver gilt, 11 x Because they were officially "banned" by the Shogunate, artists, wood block carvers and printers risked severe punishment if caught, these books were driven "underground" but nevertheless thrived during the Edo and Meiji periods, right down to the Taisho and Showa times.

The author's and writers of the text were often famous artists or poets who assumed "studio" names of a political nature to openly challenge and taunt the Shogunate. Couple under the Futon engaged in love-making. Couple love-making partially unclothed. Couple about to make love, the man licks his fingers to -wet the vulva, she spread her legs exposing her genitals -in readiness. Couple making love he is nearly nude. Couple after making love, she is before the mirror -grooming herself, nude from the hips up, exposing her -vulva. Couple fully engaged in making love on a mat, with lots -of Chirishi" [a kind of toilet paper] spread about, as -evidence of ample love juices.

Couple making love, she is on top in an unusual position. Couple making love from the rear. Couple making love while she rests on the Goh board. Couple making love he mounts her from the top. Couple engaged in love making, he inserts his penis, she -clings to him. Newlyweds engaged in love-making, she wears the typical -bride's veil. Typical Meiji period man with moustache masturbating his -lover, his huge penis at the ready as she caresses it.

Older couple making love from the rear. Couple enjoying the pleasures of fondling her vulva, his -huge penis at the ready. A sleeping woman nearly nude under the mosquito net is -being visited by her lover. A couple prepared to engage in love-making, both are -red-faced and ready to start, with their genitals -exposed. RARE print of a foreigner engaged in making love with a - Japanese woman, the surrounding text states: "Anata wo -suki. That is to say, either the foreigner could speak Japanese , or the author elected to simply use Japanese to indicate the foreigner's willingness to enjoy the pleasures of a Japanese woman and learned enough Japanese to indicate his eagerness to concert with a Japanese woman.

In any case being written in Katakana also indicates these are foreign words, or at least Japanese words spoken by a foreigner which accents the whole print. All Japanese could understand the dialogue, and surely some foreigners could learn the words and sentence essential to a successful night out on the town with Japanese prostitutes in the Yoshiwara. The foreigner's Japanese is expressed in quite a polite form, indicating at least he has learned proper Japanese during his sojourn in Japan. The woman wears a typical high-neck Victorian dress, and still has on one sock.

Her coiffeur is Japanese and she has simply pulled up her dress, revealing a red undergarment, suggestive of an "erotic nature. Clearly the message was that some houses of prostitution were well outfitted with Western settings to give an extra level of "comfort" to foreigners. Few if many exist showing foreigners in the Yoshiwara with Japanese women.

While the occurrence of foreigners and Japanese women making love were common-place in the mid-late 19th century Japan, woodblock color prints illustrating and documenting this pleasure are clearly obscure and scarce, few if any exist. It's presence in the bedroom as depicted in erotic prints indicate a profusion of love-making when thrown about the bedroom indicated evidence of love juices.

Its presence is both symbolic and practical. Compiled by Otagawa Yasuchika, the well known ivory carver. He worked in the Kano, and later Nanga styles. Eitaku: []. Superbly done, quite nice! Contents of all are clean, no worming. Orange boards, very good, p. Square quarto. Lavishly illustrated throughout. Hardcover, bound in the original publisher's full black cloth, blind embossed ornament to cover, ornamental endpapers, with pictorial dust-jacket in fine condition.

Book is in exceptionally fine condition. Excellent copy practically unused. London , Kegan Paul. Blue cloth, very good, p. Nichols, 15 x 24 cm. Origin of Japanese drama, Noh play and Kyogen or comic interludes. Kabuki plays, popular theatre, Jorui or puppet plays, the life and works of Chikamatsu including his most famous play Love Suicide and the Causes of Suicide.

Characteristics of Chikamatsu, with texts of several of his celebrated plays. Villiers David was a writer and painter known for his collections of sculpture, Picasso prints, Japanese woodcuts and drawings, and paintings. The illustrator Sir Osbert Lancaster was an English cartoonist, author, art critic and stage designer, best known to the public at large for his cartoons published in the Daily Express. Cover slightly curved and slightly yellowing. Cover corners and spine edges rubbed. Spine slightly stained and dirty. Light fingerprint-stain on edge of title-page verso, page 20 and rear whitepages.

The book is in : English. Kyoto Ogawa. Stitched green wrs. He was a Haiku poet and garden architect. Including Kinkakuji, Ginkakuji, Kiyomizu-dera, Fushimi Inaritaisha, Arashiya, Ryoanji-dera, boat excursions along the Oigawa, Gion, Sanjusangendo, leisure time along the river, Ochaya [tea houses], gardens in Higashiyama [East mountains] and many other places. Illustrates Edo period genre: noblemen, Samurai, retainers, warriors, their horses, merchants, farmers, commoners, coolies, porters, tradesmen, Matsuri [festivals], Mikoshi [portable shrines], Tanabata celebrations, Noh plays, musical concerts, Buddhist temples, monks and a host of others.

Of botanical interest, see Bartlett for additional details. As usual, the covers are dusty with a bit of old worming, worn edges and mildly rubbed, typical minor soil or stains. Original title slips are on each volume, volume 2 has the lower part missing, with a few old worm holes present. Please review photos posted to our website. Contents are woodblock printed on bright and clean Washi paper, with excellent registry and impression.

There is some of the usual mild paper toning, a few minor old worm holes here and there, mostly limited to the edges or margins. All in all a better than average set, considering it is years old. Stiff boards, accordion album, contains 11 double-page woodcut color prints, or 22 smaller prints, each Chuban page is 21 x 17 cm. The contents consists of 10 double- illustrations in full woodblock printed color. Some of the pages are slightly mis-aligned, which is normal for a book of this period and nature.

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He had several other Go or studio names, see Roberts below for more details. The action starts out with a Buddhist priest talking to an itinerant traveler. The next shows two ruffians engaged in conversation. Followed by a man with a stab wound in the belly biting his Kimono to stave off the pain, while two other men look at him. The next shows a man offering a cup of Sake to an Onnagata [woman form, actually acted by a man].

Nest shows a man holding a Kiseru tobacco pipe talking to another man and an Onnagata. Two men are locked in crossed bamboo Kendo swords during sword play and practice. Two samurai look at the same direction, one has drawn his sword in anger. Two Samurai engage in combat, the man on the right trying to avoid being roped while trying to stab his opponent with a short dagger; the other uses a fork-like weapon to jab the other man in the neck while pulling the rope tight.

Three Samurai all look to the left, one holds Kiseru pipe, the other two fans. Next shows a central Samurai figure who holds his sword, he looks at a man to his left as does an Onnagata to his right. Each of the woodblock prints are laid down on the backing, some show previous old vertical folds, minor corner wear, dusty, old minor stains, but solid and nicely executed in the usual Meiji genre. The album has mismatching covers. We tend to be over critical on condition, nevertheless this is a nice work, highly collectable.