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The author seemed to capture that sentiment fairly well in this book. A very enjoyable afternoon read. This is the first Larry Hill book I have read. I thought the story line and the setting described the years after the civil war with great accuracy. This book keep me interested to the very end. It had the hero and the girl that liked the hero.

The story line was very believable and just a really good western. I look forward to reading more of his books. I recieved this book to write and honest review. This Will Cannon book brings Will to a town being ravaged by carpetbaggers. Of course, Will rides to help the gang of women who are fighting the men trying to steal all their land. And, as usual, there is a beautiful woman very willing to help him. The town is safe and the women are saved, but Will still has not found the gang of men who murdered his family. An old-fashioned western where the good guy wins the gal and the day!.

Even at "free" this book isn't worth it. Very poorly written. At times I thought the author must be a 7th grader. Improper grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, etc. This was the first book I have read written by this author and I won't be in a hurry to read another one. I have come to enjoy this series by Larry Hill. He seems to have all the right ingredients of an interesting western.

Keep up the good work! Its an ok book. Got bored at the ending, did not keep interest. Author needs to think about the reader more! One person found this helpful. The old west lives well in this book. This Will Cannon book brings Will to a town being ravaged by carpetbaggers. Of course, Will rides to help the gang of women who are fighting the men trying to steal all their land.

And, as usual, there is a beautiful woman very willing to help him. The town is safe and the women are saved, but Will still has not found the gang of men who murdered his family. An old-fashioned western where the good guy wins the gal and the day!. Even at "free" this book isn't worth it. Very poorly written. At times I thought the author must be a 7th grader.

Improper grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, etc. This was the first book I have read written by this author and I won't be in a hurry to read another one. I have come to enjoy this series by Larry Hill. He seems to have all the right ingredients of an interesting western. Keep up the good work! Go to Amazon. Unlimited One-Day Delivery and more. There's a problem loading this menu at the moment. Learn more about Amazon Prime.

Back to top. We did not get to camp till 12 at night. Sundown found us in camp in the valley close to a splendid spring. The feint succeeded, enabling Rosecrans to bring his army across the river on a pontoon bridge. The crossing was led by Colonel Hans Christian Heg, who had raised a Wisconsin regiment of immigrant Norwegians at the outbreak of the war.

He was Webb's brigade commander. In keeping with McCook's promise, the 25th Illinois was in the vanguard of the crossing, just before dawn on August It is generally considered one of the great strategic moments of the war.

Webb describes the scene: Camp in Front, Alabama, Sept. McCook kept his word. There were 4 regts. It looked like risky business going out into the river in those boats facing the enemy. There was a sure thing that nobody could run. The river is yards wide. It was a beautiful site to see the boats in line of battle nearly a mile long pulling together regularly. It looked too many for the few rebels on the south shore for they took at once to the bushes.

We all landed together. We guarded the southern shore while the Pioneer Brigade put down the Pontoon Bridge. The rest of the Division came up last night. Today Gen. We are about 6 miles from the river. McCook complimented us highly for our efficiency in throwing across the Pontoon Bridge. Another week will show us new things perhaps. The boys are all well. Once again, the Federals got behind Bragg before he knew it and threatened to surround him completely and cut him off from his line of supply. As they hastened through two passes south of Lookout Mountain, the Rebels were forced from their positions on the heights.

The valley on both sides was alive with the moving armies of the Union, while almost the entire transportation of the army filled the roads and fields along the Tennessee No one could survey the grand scene on that bright autumn day unmoved, unimpressed with its grandeur and of the meaning conveyed by the presence of that mighty host. He crossed into Georgia and regrouped just below Pigeon Mountain, fifteen miles to the south. As the Rebels departed, the Army of the Cumberland marched in. In just twenty-three days, with little loss of life, it had marched three hundred miles, crossed three mountain ranges with ridges up to twenty-four hundred feet in height, and forded one of the mighty rivers of the West -- all in the face of the foe.

Well might Rosecrans argue, if only with a fleeting hurrah, that he could do more with strategy than other commanders with their huge expense of lives. Rosecrans is in Chattanooga with his headquarters. As soon as the Railroad is repaired to Chattanooga we intend to make Bragg hunt his hole. We are full of good rumors.

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I am sorry to hear that an early frost has spoiled the corn. Hope it is not as bad as you think. Some of the boys have had letters about Copperheads. Tell me the names of those Copperheads. I think they ought to be rode on a rail.

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Truly, Webb. Had Rosecrans stopped at Chattanooga and consolidated his hold on the town, he would today be remembered as one of the masters of the war. Instead, he mistook Bragg's orderly withdrawal for headlong retreat, rashly broke up his force, ordered McCook's corps to push south to try to cut Bragg off and Crittenden to chase him along the railroad to Ringgold and Dalton with Wilder's mounted infantry brigade. Thomas, who considered the idea of chasing Bragg imprudent, was ordered to proceed eastward through Lookout Mountain by Stevens' and Cooper's Gaps.

As the separate Union columns, scattered over a forty-mile front, filed through mountain passes into the north Georgia hills, Bragg almost succeeded in luring two of them to their demise. Failing that, he drew his army together along the banks of a creek called Chickamauga, a Cherokee word meaning "River of Death. Crittenden, commanding the Federal left, arrived first on the afternoon of September 18; Thomas brought up the center during the night; McCook, the right the following day.

Bragg was on the east side of the creek, the Federals on the west, some ways back from the bank, where they had gone into line. There they had to hold the roads back to Chattanooga, which lay through two gaps in Missionary Ridge. There was skirmishing between the armies all day on the 18th; their forces were in motion through the night; and by morning, Bragg had managed to move almost his entire infantry across the creek to the Union side.

But neither army knew the exact position of the other, and some of the division commanders were not even sure where in the woods their own men were. In this manner, the battle lines formed.

KURT JAMES NOVEL 3

But overnight that left had been extended, with Thomas marching around Crittenden to the north. In this way, he could better cover the two roads through the gaps, by posting troops between the ridge and the fords. Meanwhile, Bragg was expecting nine brigades of reinforcements from Virginia under Lee's principal lieutenant, James Longstreet.

On the morning of the 19th, three arrived under John Bell Hood, giving Bragg the larger force. Once the others came in, he would have seventy thousand men. The fate of Chattanooga was once more in the scales. Early on the 19th, Thomas sent a reconnaissance toward one of the crossings, where it came up against the dismounted cavalry of Nathan Bedford Forrest, and the fighting began. At about the same time, a Confederate reconnaissance had been groping for any soft spots in the Union left.

Thomas outflanked this party with a division of his own, and the contest spread. The Federals were outflanked in turn, more and more units were drawn in, and by midafternoon the greater portions of both armies, including Webb's unit in the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division of McCook's corps, moving up from the right, were engaged along a three-mile line. The struggle continued until sundown, and at the end of the day, a day of hard but inconclusive jousting, the Federals still held the Chattanooga roads, but the Confederates had gained some ground.

It was a restless night. Medics worked through it, tending to the wounded, though the cries of those they could not reach pierced the darkness between the camps. Pioneer brigades worked at breastworks and other barricades and entrenchments; divisions on both sides were marched and countermarched into new positions to fill gaps in their lines. Rosecrans withdrew his right from Lee and Gordon's Mill to Missionary Ridge and shortened his lines by more than a mile, as he turned his army toward the south. Meanwhile, "a sharp fire was kept up between the pickets, and, ever and anon, the booming of a cannon, startling us in our troubled slumber, reminded us of the carnage of the past day and the coming horrors" of the next.

There was gloom on the Union side. Bragg had been further reinforced, with six more brigades under Longstreet, so that his army now outnumbered the Federals by ten thousand men. It was clear he would again try to turn the Federal left, to drive it back, rout it, and seize the mountain gaps. Rosecrans consulted with his officers late into the night, then, "as was his habit," kept them "a bit longer to socialize.

The Dixie Benson Gang

At dawn, Bragg attacked as expected, hurling his troops in echelon from left to right down the Union line. Despite the ferocity of his assault, the Federals held their first positions and the battle was largely a stalemate until about noon. Then, as his center came under attack, Rosecrans mistakenly thought one of his divisions was out of position and ordered another to march out of line to fill the gap. That created a half-mile divide for the Rebels to charge through. Under Longstreet, twenty-three thousand men did just that. The Federal divisions on either side "were slammed out of place," writes one historian, "like doors swung back on their hinges and shattered by the blow.

The whole right wing was taken on its left flank, completely torn away from the rest of the army, and swept off the field in utter and hopeless rout. The headquarters of Rosecrans was overrun, and assuming the worst, he withdrew to Chattanooga with most of the other commanders to supervise its defense.

Overwrought at the debacle, it is said, he could barely stand.


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Yet all this time, Thomas had remained on the field. In spite of the enveloping chaos, he had managed to hold his wing together on the Union left, and retreating back a mile to Snodgrass Hill, a wooded knoll on Horseshoe Ridge, he rallied fleeing troops, established a defensible position on the western slope, and there, as the "Rock of Chickamauga," he withstood for several hours a dozen assaults by four Confederate divisions, until twilight at last allowed him to withdraw to Chattanooga through Missionary Ridge.

As at the Round Forest nine months before, Thomas had saved the army from destruction -- though this time not from defeat. In two days of fighting, each side had lost between sixteen thousand and seventeen thousand men. But the Confederates had won the day. Bragg reported to Richmond: "It has pleased Almighty God to reward the valor and endurance of our troops, by giving to our arms a complete victory over the enemy's superior numbers. But your task is not ended. We must drop a soldier's tear upon the graves of the noble men who have fallen by our sides and move forward. There was cold comfort in comfort so coldly stated.

Another general, haunted by the carnage, would later ask himself, with more feeling: "Are you the same man who once stood gazing down on the faces of the dead on that awful battlefield? The soldiers lying there -- they stare at you with their eyes wide open. Is this the same world? Corps hospitals had been placed at Crawfish Springs to take advantage of its ample supply of water for dressings, but that was three miles to the south and separated from the army's base by Missionary Ridge.

Chattanooga was twelve miles north. Although most of the wounded were taken to Chattanooga, others were dragged all the way back to Murfreesboro, three hundred miles to the north, over rough mountain roads in an ambulance train. The journey was a hard one, but those who survived it probably fared better in the end. That's where Webb ended up.

General Hospital No. Dear Mother, This is my first opportunity to write you since the battle. I hope it will reach you before you get the details so you will not be uneasy about me. I received a wound in the left arm, the ball ranging upwards through the deltoid muscle to lodge in the shoulder near the joint. The surgeon is going to cut it out next week perhaps. Think I will join the company in a month.

I was wounded in Saturday's engagement [i. There is some others reported but I don't recollect their names. Out of 33 who went into the battle, only 13 stacked arms. Several of the boys are lost from the company, perhaps killed. I was pretty near the last man wounded on Saturday.

I saw I. The company only stacked six guns that night. Don't know certain Henry Beevers [Bill's brother] is here. He is wounded in the leg. Send me a Charleston Ledger [the hometown newspaper] please. Webb's injury was more severe than he let on, and it kept him in the hospital for almost four months. The prospects for Webb keeping his arm were not very good. As one Union doctor tactfully put it, "The minie ball striking bone does not permit much debate about amputation.