Manual Fanny Hill, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Fanny Hill, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Fanny Hill, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure book. Happy reading Fanny Hill, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Fanny Hill, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Fanny Hill, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure Pocket Guide.

Help us improve this article! Contact our editors with your feedback. Edit Mode. Fanny Hill. Tips For Editing. You may find it helpful to search within the site to see how similar or related subjects are covered. Any text you add should be original, not copied from other sources. At the bottom of the article, feel free to list any sources that support your changes, so that we can fully understand their context.

Internet URLs are the best. Thank You for Your Contribution! Uh Oh. There was a problem with your submission. Please try again later. Article History.


  • Customers who bought this product also bought?
  • A Run Of Bad Luck (Pete Fairhurst Thrillers Book 1).
  • Fanny Hill, or Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure.
  • Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure!

Some of it makes fifty shades look tame although if you read my review of that, my complaint there was that it really wasn't as graphic as advertised. I was also pleased while simultaneously offended at the progressive description of female sexuality. Especially after reading such cr So I'm not really sure where to go here. Especially after reading such criticisms as Moran and Greer, this is a book written by a man over years ago in which he credits women with active sexual desire.

However, I was offended by the fact that the portrayal did not come across as accurate. Instead, it really does read like a bad porno movie.

Additional product information

You can just see the male perspective "you know she wants it, can't you tell she just really, really wants it" oozing out of the text and the implication is less that a woman would become a prostitute out of economic necessity and more that the women who are prostitutes are self-selected nymphomaniacs who just can't get enough sex.

The plot itself was ridiculously bad and contrived and full of conveniences. The heroine very easily stumbles across peepholes and is able to watch all sorts of scenes during which she is "educated" on the ways of the pleasure seekers. Similarly, all of the prostitutes end up losing their virginity to men that are attractive and young and to whom they are immensely attracted. I thought the first episode in which Fanny almost loses her virginity to the fat old man to be most realistic and was disappointed that it wasn't consummated or at least have one other girl with a similar story in which it was consummated.

It was just way too disney-fied if I can apply that term to something so clearly not disney-esque with the love story angles on top of the prostitution. Along with this, the girls paramours and long term "keepers" were also usually attractive and young or at least not disguisting. The only two men who are slightly unattractive are the chubby guy who gets off on masochistic acts and the small dicked guy who needs viagra.

But ultimately, Fanny doesn't really mind either of these fellows. The ending was also annoying in part because she was conveniently re-united with Charles and now she's rich to boot , but also because despite the fact that the lesson here is really "living with Vice isn't so bad" but Cleland tries to change it to "Virtue is better". She does not choose virtue and is then rewarded; she has chosen vice, is rewarded monetarily and then is re-united with Charles and choses virtue simply because she wants no other man.

It is just sort of "blechh-y", but I would imagine a necessary conclusion to this novel back when it was written. There were two language points that I was surprised with: "Does" was used to describe the prostitutes and I wondered if this was a slang that somehow originated from or led to the term "john doe" especially since men who frequent prostitutes are now called johns ; and she describes being taken from behind while lying on her side as "spoon-fashion", which made me wonder if it originated the term "spooning".

Just interesting to see sexual slang from modern times used in a book like this. Finally, I was offended that Fanny was so put out by homosexuals. She describes it all as unnatural and wants to call in the police after witnessing a homo-erotic act. She is fine with a guy hiring her to tie him up and beat him with switch until he bleeds and even allows this same dude to hit her clit with the switch but yet she is offended just because some guys want to have sex with each other? This just seemed a bit unbelievable. Especially given that I have heard that use of the "back door" was fairly common as a type of birth control; why would she find it so unnatural and offensive.

Overall it is an amazingly interesting book from a historical perspective. The smut isn't bad, but the plot is awful. Mar 26, Kim rated it did not like it Shelves: own , zzzzz , eye-bleach. This was pretty fucking awful. The writing is terrible - I don't care what century you're from.

Fanny Hill – The Most Famous Banned Book in Britain

Entire paragraphs that consist of one long, bloated sentence with about fourteen commas? Kill me. And I'm not exaggerating when I say that this guy loved the absolute shit out of synonyms. He crammed those babies, three and four at a time, into sentences that I was barely following in the first place. He couldn't tell you, for instance, about that whore over there with the pale white skin without also This was pretty fucking awful.

He couldn't tell you, for instance, about that whore over there with the pale white skin without also making sure you know that her skin is milky, pearly, snowy and ivory as well. He also really loved referring to the penis as a: weapon of destruction, instrument of battering, tool of attack. Watch out for those damn things. I'm not sure why anyone even remembers this dude's name except for the sheer shock factor of him having written such a porny pornaganza in a time when it was generally accepted that one should keep their porniness to themselves instead of sharing it amongst their fellows in written form.

I'd like to travel back in time and puncture the weird, delusional bubble he lived in, in which orphaned children forced into prostitution somehow love and are super turned on by their aforementioned horrific predicament. And then there is romance. How cute. View all 5 comments. It was free on Gutenberg and seventeen year old Anya wanted some sexy fun times.

Unfortunately, this book was pure porn with no sexy fun times to be had. Seventeen year old Anya was very disappointed. View all 3 comments. Shelves: books. Hooray for smut! Fanny Hill, or Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure is widely considered the first pornographic novel and one of the most heavily banned books around. I also would have to agree with other reviewers who complained of it being rather penis-centric the women just ooh and aah over all the amazing penises Hooray for smut!

I also would have to agree with other reviewers who complained of it being rather penis-centric the women just ooh and aah over all the amazing penises , hypocritical with regard to homosexual sex women with women was fine; men with men, not so much , and overly chauvinistic a woman can't be anything without a man However, I did really enjoy the character of Fanny Hill and think that her wily ways are enough to make every prude blush and make Samantha Jones of Sex and the City fame proud Still beats much of today's erotica.

Anne says "Cleland was the first writer to represent sexual acts as something beautiful, rather than vulgar or ridiculous. Shelves: novellas , classics , british-literature , books-you-must-read-before-you , mtbr-challenge , read , hfth-century , banned-books , e-books , gutenberg. Free download available at Project Gutenberg. Opening lines: I sit down to give you an undeniable proof of my considering your desires as indispensable orders. Ungracious then as the task may be, I shall recall to view those scandalous stages of my life, out of which I emerged, at length, to the enjoyment of every blessing in the power of love, health and fortune to bestow; whilst yet in the flower of youth, and not too late to employ the leisure afforded me by great ease and affluence, to cultiva Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

Ungracious then as the task may be, I shall recall to view those scandalous stages of my life, out of which I emerged, at length, to the enjoyment of every blessing in the power of love, health and fortune to bestow; whilst yet in the flower of youth, and not too late to employ the leisure afforded me by great ease and affluence, to cultivate an understanding, naturally not a despicable one, and which had, even amidst the whirl of loose pleasures I had been tossed in, exerted more observation on the characters and manners of the world than what is common to those of my unhappy profession, who, looking on all though or reflection as their capital enemy, keep it at as great a distance as they can, or destroy it without mercy.

I wonder why this book was considered as a banned book. Just found out at Wikipedia : In the 19th century, copies of the book were sold "underground. It was not until , after the failure of the British obscenity trial of Lady Chatterley's Lover in that Mayflower Books, run by Gareth Powell, published an unexpurgated paperback version of Fanny Hill.

The police became aware of the edition a few days before publication, after spotting a sign in the window of the Magic Shop in Tottenham Court Road in London, run by Ralph Gold. An officer went to the shop and bought a copy and delivered it to the Bow Street magistrate Sir Robert Blundell, who issued a search warrant. At the same time, two officers from the vice squad visited Mayflower Books in Vauxhall Bridge Road to determine if quantities of the book were kept on the premises.

They interviewed the publisher, Gareth Powell, and took away the only five copies there. The police returned to the Magic Shop and seized copies of the book, and in December Ralph Gold was summonsed under section 3 of the Obscenity Act. By then, Mayflower had distributed 82, copies of the book, but it was Gold rather than Mayflower or Fanny Hill who was being tried, although Mayflower covered the legal costs.

The trial took place in February The defence argued that Fanny Hill was a historical source book and that it was a joyful celebration of normal non-perverted sex—bawdy rather than pornographic. The prosecution countered by stressing one atypical scene involving flagellation, and won. Mayflower decided not to appeal. However the case had highlighted the growing disconnect between the obscenity laws and the social realities of late s Britain, and was instrumental in shifting views to the point where in an unexpurgated version of Fanny Hill was once again published in Britain.

Overdrafts of Pleasure - The Paris Review Divided into two long letters written by Fanny to a female friend, this feels like a book of two halves.

Citation Information

The first makes an intervention into the standard story of the innocent young woman, alone and without resources: Fanny makes her way to London, falls in love then loses her beloved Charles. Taken advantage of, and after a brief period of distress, rather than wringing her hands Fanny finds herself taking to her new-found role as a purchased mistress and rather good at both giving and taking Divided into two long letters written by Fanny to a female friend, this feels like a book of two halves. Taken advantage of, and after a brief period of distress, rather than wringing her hands Fanny finds herself taking to her new-found role as a purchased mistress and rather good at both giving and taking sexual pleasure.

This is definitely the better half, and makes interesting reading alongside other C18th novels such as Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded and Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady. Fanny isn't extraordinarily beautiful, she is economically-disadvantaged yet is given some agency, something figured by the way in which she is the owner of a gaze which dwells lasciviously on the physical charms of her male lovers, putting them into the position of being looked at in a way which is usually reserved for women.

Additional product information

The second half is actually duller unless you're reading this merely as a piece of 'pornography' in which case it's definitely more inventive! What makes this such a scandalous novel is the ending: view spoiler [ rather than being castigated and punished, Fanny triumphs - she inherits a fortune from one of her clients, and is happily reunited with Charles, her lost love, and ends up with an unexpectedly happy-ever-after ending, married to the only man she's always loved and deliriously happy! It just would have been nice if there'd been a bit more story and fewer encounters with yet another massive penis in part two!

Mar 23, Jennifer rated it liked it Recommends it for: classic erotica buffs. Shelves: classics , porn. I had no idea when I read this that people could be so naughty "back then".


  1. The Huge Farewell (And Other Short Stories).
  2. Die internationale strategische Allianz Renault-Nissan (German Edition).
  3. Tirature 2012 (Il Saggiatore/Fondazione Mondadori) (Italian Edition).
  4. Del amor y de las pasiones (Spanish Edition).
  5. FANNY HILL : Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure;
  6. The Apprentice of Fyordorn.
  7. I am thinking I wouldn't even blink at the book now and would probably grumble at the lack of plot - but when I was a teen and I read this - it was shocking and kind of funny. Jan 24, Grace Harwood rated it really liked it. Oh my Goodness, I find it so hard to believe that this book came out of the same century as the works of Mrs Radcliffe!! I could hardly believe what I was reading as something which came out just a few decades earlier than those Radcliffean novels of sensibility and refined heroines. Fanny Hill is anything but refined.

    From Radcliffe you will get elongated descriptions of scenery which will elevate your soul - from this you get elongated descriptions of something else I read Oh my Goodness, I find it so hard to believe that this book came out of the same century as the works of Mrs Radcliffe!! I read the Penguin Popular Classics edition and like all eighteenth century texts, it takes a few pages to "get your ear in tune" and start decoding the flowery language, but once you get past that, well I was shocked and amused in equal measure.

    I think the one thing you can say about this book, is that you can definitely tell that it was written by a man with a male perspective of women and sex. What woman in her right mind would say of herself: "Violent passions seldom last long, and those of women least of any. Once you get past the many and frequent descriptions of male and female genitalia and various sexual adventures, this is an interesting book if you are a student of the 18th Century.

    There's commentary on degeneration of the species in here " I worried about her at the end when she offered her fortune to her returned first lover - life in the eighteenth century was so precarious she could so easily have fallen foul of that. However, it seems that he was an honourable man after all and a happy ending was on the cards for her. Like other reviewers, I couldn't help thinking about disease and the threat of violence which must have been far more prevalent than the blithe Fanny relates in her tale. Also, I couldn't help thinking about Mrs Radcliffe, particularly when I read on two occasions in the book of the women " This is a vastly entertaining book.

    I've never read those fifty shades books but I'm told that the quality of writing is terrible. However, in here there is a bit of everything: straight sex, gay sex, voyeurism, orgies, sado-masochism AND it's well-written. This is what happens when you read too much Alan Moore. I actually enjoyed this story more than I thought. I wasn't really sure what to expect, it's porn after all.

    I liked the disruptions though. Some of them read liked a regular novel and some most the sex scenes got overly ridiculous which made the book fun.


    • Fanny Hill;
    • Bridies Choice.
    • Governing Lethal Behavior in Autonomous Robots.
    • Navigation menu!

    Most of this was dated though. I'll give it slack for being one of the earliest erotica novels in English. Nov 13, Sarah Jacquie rated it it was amazing Shelves: romance , erotic. Controversial books written before America was even a country I'm in. Not big on romance, and I definitely don't read erotica. I went in thinking this would be amusingly tame and innocent, something like Moll Flanders or Vanity Fair with an R rating a bit ahead of it's time.

    FANNY HILL MEMOIRS OF A WOMAN OF PLEASURE FULL AudioBook

    This book is one of many that were able to to see the light of day legally, and I've found I've enjoyed most of these so far. Except this one.

    Fanny Hill - Wikipedia

    This is the first where I felt there was no purpose except for a man who wanted to write a long winded fantasy as a woman. From there, he gives a misogynistic perspective about loss of virginity, easy women, and basically painfully drawn out sex scenes. Which is totally okay if that is your thing! I'm not judging. And at times funny. If there is anything about this book I did like, it was the description of anatomy and certain acts. Maypoles will never be the same.

    I read a few passages out loud to my boyfriend and mum, who both laughed with me. I was a bit frowny at parts because the author writes from the perspective s of women enjoying a man taking advantage of them when they put up a fight um, its rape period but the men giving them such "pleasure" makes the deflowering act forgivable and the woman forever fond of her rapist.

    Hence, the main character's exploits all take place in an upscale brothel. I saw the book to the end. Wouldn't do it again. Historically amusing, came away with some vocabulary for 18th century anatomy. I'm lazy. This is just some well written porn. That's it. There was no plot, no story whatsoever, just a main character who fell in love with a different man every couple of pages and a lot, I mean a lot, of sex.

    I actually skipped some of the sex parts, because they got too repetitive and boring after a while. Nothing really happens in this book and I was a bit disappointed by that. I was actually quite excited to read this because of how controversial it was when it first came out all those years ago, and This is just some well written porn. I was actually quite excited to read this because of how controversial it was when it first came out all those years ago, and I live for controversial books.

    I was expecting an intriguing story, but all I got was freaking porn. I read it super quickly though, which I guess is a plus. Jun 19, Daniel Namie rated it really liked it. Granted the first pages are nothing other than pure erotic ecstasy, but like the novelty of a new porn, the lust starts to fade and the yearning for the end become mildly impatience. Besides from my impatience as a reader, the content gave insightful perspective in the mind of a highly sexual woman. Fanny Hill, a woman who was extremely progressive for her time, learned the power she held over men and the power men held over her.

    She was a woman who listened to her conscious. Who engaged and satisfied her sexual appetite and pleased her partner. Fanny Hill looked upon sex as an art to learn, to be educated by, to practice freely and openly. However, like most contraband, that did not stop it from finding its way into the hands of some people.

    The book continued to be banned in the U. It demonstrates how much times have changed. The heroine of the book, Fanny, is, as the title explains, a sex worker who is quite successful. Fanny, originally from Lancashire, moves to London when, at the age of 14, her parents die of smallpox, leaving her penniless. While looking for domestic work, she is lured into a brothel.