Manual THE BOOKS OF IS: BOOK ONE: THE DANCE OF BECOMING

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Despite her mother's disapproval, Veda lives to dance. She shares in an apartment with her parents and her grandmother. Gram was widowed early and at a time when Indian women had a hard time working, she went back to school and became a teacher. Veda's parents bucked tradition, too. Her mother came from a wealthy family, but was disowned when she married someone from a different caste. Dad is a librarian, Mom works in a bank. They aren't rich, but are happy, even though Mom struggles with Veda's Despite her mother's disapproval, Veda lives to dance.

They aren't rich, but are happy, even though Mom struggles with Veda's love of dance, because she wants her to have a career as an engineer or something similar. Veda's riding home after winning a dance competition when a truck hits their van, killing the driver and crushing one of her legs below the knee so badly it has to be amputated. At first, Veda is devastated, unable to imagine life without dance. Two things happen that set her on a new and ultimately exciting path. Her grandmother tells her about Akka, a woman who was an amazing dancer, specializing in the same kind of dance as Veda was doing before the accident, but who focused on the spiritual aspect.

The second is the interest an American man takes in working with Veda to create an artificial limb that will be custom designed so she will be able to dance again. Her road back is anything, but easy. Veda has a crush on Jim, the American, and must deal with feelings of anger and embarrassment when she realizes her mistake. She is accepted by Akka, but has to start by dancing with little kids while she regains balance and flexibility.

Her chagrin is tempered by the interest and spirituality of Govinda, the boy who is about her age and teaches her class. As the story moves to its conclusion, Veda must come to grips with a completely new way of dancing, how to look at her world and those in it through fresh eyes, the loss of a loved one and the difficulty of waiting for someone she cares about a lot, working through his own fears and need to be strong in the face of other's expectations.

This is a wonderful book for younger teens. Those interested in other cultures, spirituality and dealing with loss and having to make a major life change will certainly like this book. It's an excellent choice for both school and public libraries.

Jan 03, Emily Knapp rated it it was amazing. In the heart-warming book A Time To Dance, written by Padma Venkatraman, a young girl is forced to relearn the Indian dance bharatanatyam. Veda has worked on her dancing skills for a long time, and she finally won a competition, but shortly after she encounters an accidents that causes her to become a below-knee amputee.

Veda has to work hard to relearn bharatanatyam, but she is willing to do that even if it means finding a different meaning to dance. I loved this book for many reasons, and one In the heart-warming book A Time To Dance, written by Padma Venkatraman, a young girl is forced to relearn the Indian dance bharatanatyam. I loved this book for many reasons, and one was that it was fast to read. It was written like poetry, so I flew through it. That also made the book unique.

Although this book is fiction, the story was inspired by other dancers that had physical disabilities. This book made me feel grateful for my body and the fact that I never had to relearn what I love. She went from being a champion bharatanatyam dancer to having to dance with beginners in order to dance again. It also made me think about how much passion Veda had for dance and how hard she would have had to work to be able to do what she did. This book was packed with great life-lessons, but one that stood out to me is to never give up. Veda lost her leg and had to learn to walk with it so that she could dance with it.

Jun 06, Liviania rated it it was amazing. Veda is a Bharatanatyam dancer in Chennai who has just won an important competition, one that could maybe convince her parents that she's serious about becoming a professional dancer. A car wreck on the way home destroys her foot, and her leg is amputated below the knee. Veda struggles to recover when she's offered the chance to join a medical trial and get an advanced prosthetic. I know the barest bit of Bharatanatyam from my lessons on South Indian music. Author Padma Venkatraman allowed me to Veda is a Bharatanatyam dancer in Chennai who has just won an important competition, one that could maybe convince her parents that she's serious about becoming a professional dancer.

Author Padma Venkatraman allowed me to visualize it, despite my unfamiliarity. She describes the poses and feelings beautifully. As Veda learns to dance again, she comes to a new understanding of the meaning of the dance. The spiritual and religious meaning of Bharatanatyam is explored, as well as what that means for Veda and her own relationship with Shiva. However, Venkatraman's long, fluid lines read almost like prose. This is not a book that will trip up a reader unfamiliar with or intimidated by poetry.

Veda's family is very important to her, particularly her beloved Paati. She struggles to hang out with her friends the same as she did before the accident, and doesn't know how to handle the overtures of friendship from her former dance rival.

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She crushes on the doctor who gets her into the prosthetic trial and her new beginning dance teacher, who is her age. Then, of course, there is Veda's relationship with her body. She loved its strength, but she feels like she lost her beauty when she lost her old dancing ability. Veda is a compelling heroine who undergoes a complicated personal journey, and Venkatraman's writing is gorgeous. It's also an intriguing glimpse into another culture.

Aug 12, Soplada rated it really liked it. It tells us about the Passion of dancing a special type of Indian dancing I forgot what it is called actually but it is a strange name and a girl who has faith in her surroundings. I liked how Padma tackles the love issue ; so lightly as the breeze in the night by the lake which holds the lotus aloft I feel I can see his soul shining in the depths of his eyes. Govinda's personality is like Haku's in Spirited Away movie by the legend Hayao Miyazaki : and that made me interested in his individuality So light and sweet in verse novel that delivers a glorious Meanings in a very smooth way.

Feb 05, Cathy rated it it was ok Shelves: minority-literature , youngadult , poetry , tweens. This is a novel in verse, so I was hoping to continue my streak of finishing a book a day.


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However, despite being much easier to read, it took me about a week to finish because the verse itself was not really enticing as poetry. I was missing the kind of dripping imagery and crafted rhythm that pulls me into poems in the first place. This felt more like simple sentences and straight story telling broken up to look like poetry based on the length of the sentences on paper.

What intrigued me about This is a novel in verse, so I was hoping to continue my streak of finishing a book a day. What intrigued me about this book was the chance to really experience a different topic - the power of bharatanatyam, and all dance, but especially this eastern Indian dance, to heal what is inside of Veda once she is broken.

Once Veda had her accident, the story got more readable because of her raw emotion and new understanding of what this dance could do for her. I'm glad I stuck it out, but it could have just been written in prose. A Time to Dance was pretty good. I loved that it was set in India. I loved the dancing element, which was pretty fun and interesting.

I thought the verse aspect worked pretty well, though it could have been told pretty well in prose. Veda was an interesting character. I liked that she had a lot to figure out. I loved how the story dealt with disability and perceptions of beauty and friendshi A Time to Dance was pretty good. I loved how the story dealt with disability and perceptions of beauty and friendship. I guess my one problem was that Jim was a total 'white saviour'.

He didn't need to be American to play a role in the story, but he was presented as if being American made him superior somehow. That's just silly imo. Still, a really good story for anyone who want to learn about Indian culture. It's written in verse! Jan 19, Kelly added it Shelves: ya-fiction , read-in Though it tackles some tough topics -- grief and loss in multiple ways -- Venkatraman's novel-in-verse set in India is quite sweet. Veda's a Bharatanatyam dancer and she's one of the best around; she likes to compete.

On the day of a huge competition, where she's walked away a champion, she's in a devastating accident and loses one of her legs. But through the power of her spirit and the will to make the most of her prosthetic, Veda relearns how to dance and more, she relearns how to love the ar Though it tackles some tough topics -- grief and loss in multiple ways -- Venkatraman's novel-in-verse set in India is quite sweet. But through the power of her spirit and the will to make the most of her prosthetic, Veda relearns how to dance and more, she relearns how to love the art of dance for what it is on a personal level.

There's a nice romance here that doesn't feel forced nor does it feel shoehorned in; it's there and part of Veda's story in a very natural, realistic way. Likewise, there's a great thread about family, about the pressure that Veda feels to live up to her mother's standards while simultaneously pursuing her own dreams and desires.

Dec 19, Mallika Shankar rated it really liked it. I really liked this book. I thought that there could have been so much more to it though. I feel like the author left it unfinished. It was a really easy read not too much depth but the plot was really inspiring. How Veda fought on even after a huge loss. I feel like the Patti could have had a much bigger role in the book as at first she seemed like one of the main characters but as the story progressed her character was not as prominent, and Jim too.

They both seemed like characters that would I really liked this book. They both seemed like characters that would be very important but they just died down.

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I would recommend this book to anyone who wants a quick easy read that is inspirational. View all 4 comments. One of the presentations I was at this week focused on poetry as a "container for emotions," a safe space to express hurt, pain, grief, anger, joy, etc. This book contained all of the emotions, and made me feel them, at 30, feet, in a metal tube with strangers, while I silently wept--with joy, and sadness, and anger--for Uma, for Paati, for Govinda, for Veda, and for Ma.

I got to hear Padma Venkatraman talk about her choice to mimic the music of the world in the lyrical flow of the book, and One of the presentations I was at this week focused on poetry as a "container for emotions," a safe space to express hurt, pain, grief, anger, joy, etc. I got to hear Padma Venkatraman talk about her choice to mimic the music of the world in the lyrical flow of the book, and I felt it.

Thaiya thai, thaiya thai Nov 30, A. The book not only explores grief over the loss of a limb and a loved one, but it also explores the role of spirituality in becoming a full realized person and emphasizes the essential need for compassion to be a full person. I loved the complexity of the narrative and the beauty of the message. I did wish the intricacy of the poetry matched the depth of the plot and theme, but I do prefer novels in poetry vs.

Jul 02, Peg rated it really liked it. I've had this book for at least one year. My experience with books written in verse has not been very positive. Deciding to pick this book up and give it one more try was a good decision. What a wonderful story. It has definitely changed the way I feel about verse. It told a story plain and simple - one filled with so many emotions. A book deserving of the awards it has won. Definitely a book worth reading! Readers also enjoyed. Videos About This Book. More videos She brings her considerable experience of moving to bear on the basic questions that engage us all: mattering, meaning, connecting, healing, loving, and caring for the earth.

Don Hanlon Johnson, author of Body, Spirit, and Democracy LaMothe gracefully reminds us that every part of our life is in motion and that when we dance we are healed, renewed, and made whole by the natural movement of our moving nature. This book brings an extraordinary wake-up call, an energized jolt reminding us that all professions and practices need to give birth to 'movement-oriented ways of knowing. Philosophers interested in writing about dance may find this book as a source of thoughtful provocation. Edyta J. Kuzian, Metapsychology Highly recommended.

Journal of Dance Movement and Spiritualities. Acknowledgments Why Dance? To Dance Is to Matter 2. Judging Books by Their Covers: U. This Chart Is a Lonely Hunter: The Narrative Eros of the Infographic : Novelist Reif Larsen delivered a richly illustrated tour of the infographic, plumbing our fascination with information, beautifully presented.

Six Experts Share Their Opinions : Kevin Hartnett again polled the experts, this time to discover the best on offer from the prolific 19th century master. Her argument is both clever and convincing. Are eReaders Really Green? The Anatomy of Book Reviews : We always seem to be in a crisis of book reviewing, but Darryl Campbell wanted to mark out some territory for what the book review should be, not just what it is.

Along the way he breaks down the form to its essentials. Get ready to have an entire genre irrevocably spoiled.

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There are also a number of older pieces that Millions readers return to again and again. The Best of the Millennium So Far : Our late series invited a distinguished panel of writers and thinkers to nominate the best books of the decade. The ensuing list stoked controversy and interest that has lingered. Introducing Difficult Books, A Descriptive List : Our currently dormant, but still fascinating series on the most challenging yet rewarding books ever published. There must be a lot of people name-dropping Goethe out there.

The initial, aborted attempt remains popular as well. Where did all these readers come from? Google and Facebook and Twitter and Tumblr and Reddit sent quite a few of course, but many Millions readers came from other sites too. These were the top 10 sites to send us traffic in Andrew Sullivan and the rest of The Daily Beast 3.

The New Yorker 4. The Browser 5. The Rumpus 6. Publishers Weekly 7. MetaFilter 8. Slate 9.


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The Morning News. Claw and his menacing feline in Inspector Gadget? Makes them less villainous, really. The female ones, specifically. Is it anti-feminist to write an evil woman? I hope not, because there are some truly fabulous cunts in fiction. Edith Stoner in Stoner. At the start of their courtship, we learn: Her needlepoint was delicate and useless, she painted misty landscapes of thin water-color washes, and she played the piano with a forceless but precise hand; yet she was ignorant of her own bodily functions, she had never been alone to care for her own self one day of her life, nor could it have ever occurred to her that she might become responsible for the well-being of another.

Her unhappiness is a weapon she uses in their marriage, and the above passage only hints at her capacity for viciousness. She usurps his home office, she pits their daughter against him. Oh, how she terrorizes Stoner! It takes everything in me to summon up sympathy for Edith — to even comprehend the depth of her meanness. I am made of steel and wood. But when I reach out to sympathize with her, she bites my hand.

That might be true, for her cruelty renders her inhuman. She feels no empathy, thinks only of herself. Of course she is. Here is a description of her as a school girl: Cathy grew more lovely all the time. The delicate blooming skin, the golden hair, the wide-set, modest, and yet promising eyes, the little mouth full of sweetness, caught attention and held it.

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With prose rhythm like that, I forgive this book for all of its flaws, for the way it demonizes a woman for using her sexuality to get what she wants. Zenia in The Robber Bride. If she wants something or someone , she uses her body to get it. But she uses something else, too, and that something remains a mystery to the characters. Her novels are often about women and the issues that preoccupy them, from family to their bodies to friendships with other women. With Zenia, though, her behavior seems motivated only by a need to lie, rather than by something more complex and sympathetic.

Atwood is a feminist writer because she writes flawed female characters who, like real people, judge one another. Evil is not gender-specific, though the way we vilify others often is. There you have it, though this is certainly not an exhaustive list. Who are your favorite vile women in literature? Thank you! A wonderful post about a truly wonderful series of novels. Now I think of him whenever I see the books on my shelf.

They are a pleasure to read, and well worth the investment of time! I have to fess up to being the publicist for these books in the States, but they also have been my favorite books in the world for fifteen years. There really is nothing like Dance. I think this has prompted me to cease deferring gratification and pick up volume three—and for that I thank you. I finally read these around five years back after lustfully eyeing their spines at my local bookstore for decades, as you say. I loved them for all the reasons you mention, and look forward to returning to them. A wonderful review of my favorite series of English comic novels.

One very minor correction. The Prince is almost certainly from a Balkan, not a Baltic, country. Dick and Levi, thank you both for your corrections.